Contributions in this collection

Due Diligence: Actions to Enable NGOs and Companies to Work Together for the Common Good

by Diane de Saint-Affrique Would it be possible for NGOs and companies that are genuinely convinced, and have adopted a continuous improvement approach to achieve the goals of the 2017 French Dury of Vigilance Act, to get together to work for the common good? Wouldn't this pragmatic approach be more effective than waiting for new standards to be imposed that will not necessarily be appropriate for the issues addressed or the scope under consideration, and will thereby maintain an ambiguity that can only be dispelled by a court decision?

Due Diligence: What are NGOs’ minimum requirements for companies?

by Diane de Saint-Affrique | NGOs have made the following observation: companies often see their due diligence plan as a communication plan rather than a strategic development tool designed to map and prevent risks and to implement a strategy tailored to CSR issues. NGOs want companies to change their attitude and genuinely comply with the obligation of monitoring the entire value chain, which implies mobilising all the stakeholders, disseminating information transparently, introducing precise indicators and significantly changing the corporate culture.

Due Diligence: What Scope of Application ?

by Diane de Saint-Affrique | At a time when the European Commission is addressing the issue of due diligence, and given the crucial impact of this reform on European companies and the continuation of various international commercial exchanges, the think tank SKEMA PUBLIKA considered it vital to carry out an in-depth study with the main stakeholders – non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and companies affected by the regulation – to get their feedback on the application of France’s 2017 Duty of Vigilance Act and its impact in economic and commercial terms, and find out their views on this new EU draft directive.

[Video] Jean-Philippe Courtois: digital innovation as a lever for corporate sustainability

In this video, Jean-Philippe Courtois, Executive Vice President and President of National Transformation Partnerships at Microsoft and President of SKEMA Business School and Claude Revel, Director of the think tank SKEMA Publika discuss corporate sustainability in light of the new EU non-financial reporting directive. They also discuss how innovative digital tools, using AI and Cloud technologies can help companies measure their ESG impact, and best meet the demands of legislators.

Due Diligence: What do NGOs Think of France’s 2017 Duty of Vigilance Act?

by Diane de Saint-Affrique | At a time when the European Commission is addressing the issue of due diligence, and given the crucial impact of this reform on European companies and the continuation of various international commercial exchanges, the think tank SKEMA PUBLIKA considered it vital to carry out an in-depth study with the main stakeholders – non-governmental organisations (NGOs) and companies affected by the regulation – to get their feedback on the application of France’s 2017 Duty of Vigilance Act and its impact in economic and commercial terms, and find out their views on this new EU draft directive.

[Event] Sustainable Finance: Governance and Metrics

The different European regulations are compelling companies and organisations to adapt their governance to achieve the objectives of corporate social responsibility (CSR). The aim of the regulations is much broader, since they seek the implementation of a governance adapted to achieving all CSR objectives, hence the need for accurate and reliable measurement tools.

CSR and governance: the importance of implementing self-regulation

The governance landscape has changed in recent years, due in particular to the influence of new corporate social responsibility (CSR) standards that have emerged. These two concepts, governance and CSR, now appear to be inextricably linked and are part of a new reality in business management.

Democracy Operates through Businesses too

The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) argues that businesses should benefit their communities and operate in an economically, socially and environmentally sustainable manner.